Nursing Home Finder | Nursing Home Reviews | Healthcare News | Medicare | Medigap | Medigap Plans & Medicare Supplements
Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) - Healthcare Quality Improvement Campaign
Testosterone Replacement Therapy Pills
Latest posts by Trayton (see all)

Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT)

Testosterone is a hormone in both males and females that has a variety of functions in the body. It is most abundant in males and is largely responsible for sperm production and testicular and prostate development; in both sexes, testosterone helps maintain fat distribution, bone density and strength, muscle mass and strength, red blood cell production, facial and body hair, and sex drive. 

Specifically looking at testosterone in men, we see t-levels peak during adolescence and early adulthood. But once men hit 30 years of age, testosterone starts to decline year by year, and it may take an even harder hit if one has hypogonadism. Because of everything testosterone does for the body, this depletion of t-levels can have negative effects on overall health and well-being, including one’s state of mind. 

In order to return testosterone levels to a normal state, many men turn to testosterone replacement therapy, or TRT—a method of replacing testosterone in the body with synthetic or bioidentical testosterone through creams, patches, gels, pills, or—most commonly—injections. 

Other men have used TRT to raise their t-levels well beyond what is necessary so that they can see even greater improvements in their rate of recovery, muscle building, endurance, protection of muscle tissue, and prevention of body fat accumulation.

Although the safety and efficacy of TRT is still being researched, many have found it to be a viable and safe option for treating abnormally low testosterone levels due to aging or hypogonadism or for increasing the benefits they already receive from testosterone.

Low T Center

Low T (low testosterone) centers, also known as men’s T clinics or men’s health clinics, are the place to go for men who are uncertain about whether or not they are suffering from low t-levels. They are also a helpful resource for men who already know they have low t-levels and want to receive treatment.

If you are a male who is unaware of the status of your testosterone levels and you want to find out where those levels are at, you can receive a health assessment and blood test by going to a low T center—and the results of these tests will give you the clarity you seek. 

After you have determined the status of your t-levels, or if you already know that you have low t-levels, low T centers can still be of help to you. At men’s T clinics, you can find health professionals who can provide guidance and treatment (including TRT) to help restore your testosterone levels. 

Many low T centers also provide treatment for other men’s health issues as well, including therapy for sleep apnea and allergies, and some of these clinics even perform annual physicals.

All that being said, you may be totally unsure where to begin. If that is you, there are certain signs and symptoms to look out for that may indicate low testosterone levels: no libido, infertility, weight gain, loss of muscle mass and strength, swollen breasts, hair loss, low energy, low self-confidence, low motivation, or sadness and depression. 

If you are experiencing two or more of these signs or symptoms, it may be time to get your blood work done at a low T center to find out for sure if you have low t-levels. That way, you can get the help you need as soon as possible to get your body back in prime condition. 

Testosterone Cypionate vs Enanthate

Testosterone cypionate and testosterone enanthate are two different types of esters that are used in testosterone injections. In fact, they are the most commonly prescribed esters for TRT in the United States, compared with other types of testosterone (propionate, decanoate, etc). Esters are a kind of organic compound; they help administer testosterone to the body via injections. 

When comparing testosterone cypionate vs enanthate, you see that they are very similar, meaning they are nearly interchangeable as testosterone injections. Both are great options for TRT injections—but here, we will look at how they are different, so you can decide which one is best for you.

The biggest difference between testosterone enanthate vs cypionate is that testosterone cypionate is injected subcutaneously and testosterone enanthate is best injected intramuscularly. 

Subcutaneous injection is the best method for TRT if you want to achieve stable levels of testosterone and minimize side effects. If you inject testosterone intramuscularly, it will absorb quicker, but your t-levels are likely to fluctuate more, which will lead to worse side effects and less stable results. 

Therefore, testosterone cypionate may be the better choice for subcutaneous injections during TRT. That being said, you can still inject testosterone enanthate subcutaneously—it just is more difficult that way.

The main thing to keep in mind when deciding which type of testosterone ester is right for you is that you want to avoid too much fluctuation in your t-levels—a steady level of testosterone in your body will help you receive the most beneficial results. 

Having explored how testosterone cypionate compares with testosterone enanthate, you should know that there is no universal right answer for whether one is best to use over the other. The right one for you may be different than what works for someone else—so ultimately, the choice is up to you. 

Testosterone Cypionate for Sale

As stated above, low T centers are one place you can go if you want to begin receiving TRT with testosterone cypionate. There are also multiple online retailers that sell testosterone cypionate injections. However, before purchasing testosterone online, you will want to conduct thorough research to make sure you purchase your testosterone cypionate injections from someone you trust. 

Alternatively, if you have taken a blood test that shows you have low testosterone levels or if you have been diagnosed with hypogonadism, you may be able to receive a prescription for testosterone cypionate by seeing a medical professional—then, you can pick up your testosterone cypionate from your local pharmacy. 

For another testosterone option, check out our Elite Health Oral Testosterone Troche!

Testosterone Enanthate for Sale

Because testosterone enanthate is so similar to and so often used interchangeably with testosterone cypionate, you can buy testosterone enanthate from the same types of places as testosterone cypionate. So just like with testosterone cypionate, a men’s T clinic is one place you can go if you want to begin TRT with testosterone enanthate. 

If you have been diagnosed with hypogonadism or low t-levels, you may be able to receive a prescription for testosterone enanthate injections from your doctor. If you want to go about it another route, or if you have not been officially diagnosed with having low t-levels, there are many online businesses where you can find testosterone enanthate for purchase. 

And again, you can check out our Elite Health Oral Testosterone Troche if you want to explore another testosterone option right away!

Testosterone Injections

Testosterone injections are shots of isolated testosterone hormone or synthetic or bioidentical testosterone. They are becoming a more popular treatment in the United States for males with low testosterone levels or hypogonadism. Although women can suffer from low t-levels as well, TRT is not generally recommended for treatment in females because testosterone injections can have masculinizing effects. 

Testosterone injections have been shown to be safe and effective for many men suffering from low t-levels. The following benefits are possible: 

  • better sexual function
  • increased muscle mass and strength
  • improved mood
  • improved cognitive function 

That being said, it is important to note that TRT injections do not cure the underlying condition of low t-levels—they only help improve the symptoms of low T. 

You should also be aware of the side effects associated with testosterone injections, including the following signs and symptoms: 

  • redness, bruising, bleeding, pain, or hardness at site of injection
  • swollen or painful breasts
  • acne
  • deeper voice
  • tiredness
  • back pain
  • joint pain
  • trouble sleeping or staying awake
  • weight gain
  • mood swings
  • headaches

Aside from these typical side effects, some people may have an allergic reaction to testosterone injections. Signs and symptoms that may indicate an allergy include trouble breathing, dizziness, or skin rashes.

You may also experience worse side effects, such as nausea or vomiting, changes in urination, lower leg pain, redness or warmth, swelling of the hands, ankles, feet, or lower legs, severe pain in the upper right part of the abdomen, or severe mood changes. If you do experience one or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. 

Considering all this, medical professionals are still researching the safety and efficacy of testosterone injections to see if their risks outweigh their benefits. As such, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved TRT to treat males with low testosterone due to disorders of the testicles, brain, or pituitary gland—testosterone injections are not currently FDA-approved to treat low t-levels caused by the natural aging process. 

To find out more about the safety and efficacy of testosterone therapy for men, click here!

On the safety and efficacy of t-therapy for women, click here

Where to Inject Testosterone

Some people like the convenience of self-administering testosterone injections at home, while others prefer to have a doctor administer the injections. If you are interested in giving yourself or having a loved one give you testosterone injections, here are some tips on where to inject the testosterone shots. 

Testosterone can be injected either subcutaneously (under the skin) or intramuscularly (into the muscle). If you want to see more stabilized t-levels, it is recommended that you inject your testosterone subcutaneously. However, you can administer the testosterone intramuscularly if you wish—you can give yourself a larger volume of testosterone per injection that way.

Once you have decided between a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, the best place to inject testosterone is up to your individual preference. You can decide from a few options, depending on which site is easiest and least painful for you:

  • Intramuscular injections can be more painful than subcutaneous injections—you administer those through the upper outer glute or the deltoid. 
  • Subcutaneous injections are reportedly less painful than intramuscular ones, and they can be administered via the abdomen or upper outer thigh (you should avoid the inner thigh, though—there are too many veins there that you could accidentally hit). 

It may be helpful for you to rotate injection sites each time. For example, if you choose to inject in your right glute first, switch over to an injection in the left glute next time. This will prevent your pain from increasing with each injection, which is what can happen if you return to the same injection site over and over again. 

How to Inject Testosterone

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 
  1. Clean the top of your testosterone vial with an alcohol swab, and let it dry completely.
  1. Attach the needle to the syringe, and pull the plunger back to fill the syringe with air (the same amount of air as the amount of testosterone you plan to inject).
  1. With your testosterone vial sitting on an even surface, insert the needle into the rubber top and push the plunger down (forcing all the air out). 
  1. Pick up the vial (with the needle inside), turn it upside down, and pull the plunger down to draw the testosterone into the syringe. 
  1. Remove the needle from the vial and swap needles; you should immediately place it in a sharps container for disposal. 
  1. Hold the syringe upright and flick the side of the syringe to move any air bubbles to the top of the syringe. Slowly push the plunger up to remove that excess air; keep pushing until you get a tiny drop of liquid from the tip (this ensures you have gotten all the air out).
  1. Clean the skin at the injection site with an alcohol swab, and let it dry completely.
  1. Hold the needle at a 90º angle to your body, and insert it into the skin. (If you are using a ½-inch needle for a subcutaneous injection, insert the needle all the way. If you are using a longer needle for an intramuscular injection, insert it 1½ inches deep.)
  1. Before fully injecting the medicine, pull back on the plunger a little. If you see blood entering the syringe, then you have hit a vein; you should remove the needle, get a new one, and try again at a different injection site. If you do not see blood, then you are good to go.
  1. Inject the medicine by pushing the plunger in.
  1. Remove the needle from the same angle you inserted it. Apply a Band-Aid if needed, and dispose of your needle and syringe in a sharps container. 

For more information on how to inject testosterone, check out these videos on our website!

Best Place to Buy Testosterone Online

As stated above, you can buy testosterone from a variety of sources. You can see your doctor if you want to try to receive a prescription for testosterone, or you can go to a low T center or men’s T clinic to see what their options are.

But if you want to find the best place to buy testosterone online, there are multiple online sources that have testosterone injections for sale. At Elite Health Online, we have an oral testosterone troche for sale! Although it is not an injection, it is a good alternative for those seeking to try TRT.

Elite Health’s oral testosterone troche is for those who want to try TRT without having to deal with injections. Although normal oral testosterone pills can cause damage to the liver (because they have to pass through the liver before they can enter the bloodstream), an oral testosterone troche gets absorbed directly into your bloodstream, bypassing the liver. 

If you want to learn more about oral testosterone troches, watch this video

To learn more about testosterone in general, we have the following blog posts and videos: Bone Density and Testosterone, Fatigue and Testosterone, Testosterone and Weight Loss, Testosterone and Beard Growth, Depression and Low Testosterone, Anxiety or Depression and Out of Balance Testosterone or Hormones, and Role of Testosterone in Women

Home

Category

Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT)

Tags

References

Consumers

We are working hard top provide valuable information for individuals and families. We make updates regularly so check back often. Join our Mailing list for UPDATE NOTICES and more information.

Providers

Frontline workers and Care Givers  ..WE APPRECIATE YOU! We are dedicated to helping you provide the highest Quality of Care and working hard to help Advance Quality Care in America.

Facility Owners

If you are a facility owner, we understand your unique position especially during these crazy times that is why we are teaming with the top professionals in research, legal and government to help you rise to the occasion.

Trending news and information in the healthcare community!

Author Recent Posts Trayton Latest posts by Trayton […]
Author Recent Posts Trayton Latest posts by Trayton […]
Author Recent Posts Trayton Latest posts by Trayton […]
Author Recent Posts Trayton Latest posts by Trayton […]

More... HEALTHCARE NEWS

This site is a non-government resource , providing information in a simple and straightforward way.

If you’re looking for the government’s Medicare site, please navigate to www.medicare.gov.

Nothing on this website should ever be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your medical provider regarding diagnosis or treatment for a health condition, including decisions about the correct medication for your condition, as well as prior to undertaking any specific exercise or dietary routine.

The purpose of this communication may be a solicitation of insurance or product offered from various advertising networks. Contact will be made by a licensed insurance agent/producer or insurance company or adviser. Medicare Supplement insurance plans are not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. government or the federal Medicare program. Many of our advertisers sell insurance offered from a number of different Medicare Supplement insurance companies.

This site is a non-government resource , providing information in a simple and straightforward way. Nothing on this website should ever be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your medical provider regarding diagnosis or treatment for a health condition, including decisions about the correct medication for your condition, as well as prior to undertaking any specific exercise or dietary routine. The purpose of any insurance communication is the solicitation of insurance. Contact will be made by a licensed insurance agent/producer or insurance company. Medicare Supplement insurance plans are not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. government or the federal Medicare program. Our advertisers sell insurance offered from a number of different Medicare Supplement insurance companies. The trademarks or service marks sold or described herein, or in blogs or advertisements, are owned by the respective trademark owners and nothing herein should be construed as a representation by this site owner or team members.